Clean Air Car Check

LOCATIONS
Crown Point - 755 N. Industrial Blvd. [map]
Gary - 3901 W. Fourth Ave. [map]
Griffith - 232 Ivanhoe Court South [map]
Hammond - 1231 Gostlin St. [map]
Hobart - 325 Sullivan St. [map]
Portage - 5777 Melton Rd. [map]
Valparaiso - 2503 Beech St. [map]

Vehicles Due for Testing in 2019
2015 2013 2011 2009 2007 2005
2003 2001 1999 1997 1995 1993
1991 1989 1987 1985 1983 1981
1979 1977        

 


Failure/Rejection Information

1996 and Newer Vehicles: On-Board Diagnostics (OBD II) Rejection/Failure Information || 1995 and Older Vehicles: I/M 93 or BAR 90 Vehicle Emissions Test || Waiver Information || Indiana Certified Emission Repair Facilities

If your plates have expired or will expire before you are able to have your vehicle repaired you may be eligible to purchase a temporary 30-day permit. Ask for more information at Clean Air Car Check's onsite partial service license branch "Drive-Thru Renew!" or at the Indiana Bureau of Motor Vehicles.

1996 and Newer Vehicles: On-Board Diagnostics (OBD II) Rejection/Failure Information

If your 1996 or newer vehicle was rejected or failed the emissions inspection the
following steps can assist you in the process of getting your vehicle into compliance.

Step 1:   Review your Vehicle Inspection Report to determine if your test result was a Reject or Fail.
Step 2: Review your vehicle’s warranty to find out what repairs may be covered. Federal law requires that the emission control systems on 1995 and newer model year vehicles be warranted for a minimum of two years or 24,000 miles.  Coverage for the on-board computer and catalytic converter is extended to eight years or 80,000 miles.
Step 3: Correct the problem.  A list of state certified repair facilities is available to help you make decisions about where to have your vehicle repaired.
Step 4:    Return to a Clean Air Car Check testing station for a re-test.  If any repairs were made on your vehicle, the person who made the repairs must complete and sign the back of your Vehicle Inspection Report before you return for a retest.  Failure to have this form properly completed and signed could result in your vehicle being refused for a retest.  If your vehicle passes, you can renew your vehicle registration at either Clean Air Car Check's onsite partial service license branch, "Drive-Thru Renew!", or at the Indiana Bureau of Motor Vehicles. If you vehicle fails or is rejected, you must repeat the steps in this brochure.
Step 5:    Repair Advice Program
Upon failing four tests, vehicles must be reviewed by the Clean Air Car Check Diagnostic Technician who will review the repairs that have been made to the vehicle, discuss repair options and help you develop a repair plan free of charge.  To schedule an appointment, call 1-888-240-1684 and select “4” in the menu.  (Please have your test and/or vehicle information available).
Vehicles that have failed four emissions tests are required to participate in the Repair Advice Program before any additional retests are permitted.

Please bring the following items to your appointment:

Your vehicle, Vehicle Inspection Report (test results), and any receipts or repair orders detailing the parts and work done to the vehicle related to failure of the emissions test.  Please make sure your hood latch is in working condition for an under hood inspection.

Please do not bring pets with you to your appointment.


If your vehicle failed an OBD test…

Listed below are common reason a vehicle might fail an OBD test:

  • The vehicle’s OBD system connector has been removed or is otherwise not working properly.  The OBD check cannot be completed if the connector is missing or is not working properly.

  • The Malfunction Indicator Light (MIL) is not working.  The MIL functions to let the vehicle operator know when there is a problem with the vehicle.

  • The MIL is illuminated.  You may see a “Service Engine Soon” or “Check Engine” light lit up. This indicates that there is a problem with your vehicle.  The specific Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) will be listed on the Vehicle Inspection Report.  These DTC’s will help your technician diagnose and repair your vehicle.  A qualified, trained automotive service technician equipped with the appropriate diagnostic repair tools should be able to properly repair your vehicle.

Depending on your vehicle’s age and mileage, repairs may be covered under the vehicle manufacturer’s warranty.

If your vehicle was rejected for an OBD test…

There are two possible reasons for an OBD vehicle to be rejected:

  • The vehicle's OBD connector is not accessible. Devices blocking the connector need to be moved to receive a test.
  • The " The vehicle's OBD system is not ready. The OBD system is comprised of several monitors that evaluate specific aspects of the emission control system. If the monitors have not completed their internal tests, the OBD system is "not ready" to report its status. Problems may be present, but not yet identified. A recently disconnected or discharged (run down) battery, or recent servicing or "clearing codes" with a scan tool are the most likely reasons for a vehicle's OBD system being "not ready."
In order for the OBD systems to become ready, the vehicle should be driven under a variety of normal operating conditions including a mix of highway driving, stop and go driving and at least one overnight off period. The vehicle's owner's manual may provide more specific information on getting your vehicle's OBD system ready. Of course, you may also consult a dealership or repair facility in the event that your vehicle's OBD system is not ready.

There are some operating conditions that will prevent a vehicle's monitors from completing. If you have driven the vehicle regularly under a variety of driving conditions and the vehicle continues to reject because its monitors are not ready, you may need to consult a qualified repair facility to rule out other problems.

1995 and Older Vehicles: I/M 93 or BAR 90 Vehicle Emissions Test

If your 1995 or older vehicle failed the emissions inspection, the following steps can assist you in the process of getting your vehicle into compliance. 

Step 1:

Review the Vehicle Inspection Report (VIR) to find out why your vehicle failed

            Types of Failures:

    • Emissions Failure.  The vehicle exceeds one or more of the allowable emission limits.
    • Tampering Failure. If you vehicle was originally manufactured with a catalytic converter and it is missing, disconnected or damaged, it will fail this portion of the test.  The vehicle must be repaired and retested.
    • Gas Cap Failure. All vehicles require an appropriate and properly sealed gas cap.  If the gas cap does not seal properly and allows fuel vapor to leak from the fuel tank, the vehicle will fail this portion of the test.  Clean Air Car Check does stock many of the most common gas caps and will provide a complimentary replacement gas cap then retest your vehicle. 
      If we do not stock the correct gas cap for your vehicle, you will need to obtain a new, properly fitting gas cap and return for a retest.
Step 2: Review your warranty
Federally required emission control warranties protect the vehicle owner for the cost of repairs for certain emissions-related failures resulting for manufacturer’s defects and workmanship that cause your vehicle to exceed emission standards. For specific details or questions on your vehicle’s warranty, please refer to your owner’s manual or contact your dealership.
Step 3:    Repair your vehicle
Anyone may repair your vehicle; however, if your 1981-1995 model year vehicle fails the retest and you decide to apply for a waiver, only repairs made by an Indiana Certified Emissions Repair Technician will count towards the waiver minimum expenditure limit.  A list of Indiana Certified Emissions Repair shops that have completed specific training for repairing emission failures was provided to you at the time of your test. Additional copies are available at the station or you can view the list below.
                 
For 1976 – 1980 vehicles, repairs are not required to be made by an Indiana Certified Emissions Repair shop to count toward a minimum expenditure waiver.
Step 4:  

Return for a retest
Before you return for your retest, the person who made the repairs on your vehicle must complete and sign the back of your Vehicle Inspection Report (VIR).  Repair facilities must include their federal tax ID number.  Failure to have this form properly completed and signed may result in your vehicle being refused for a retest.
                 
If the vehicle passes you can renew your registration at either Clean Air Car Check's onsite partial service license branch "Drive-Thru Renew!"or at the Indiana Bureau of Motor Vehicles.

If the vehicle fails again, you should discuss the failure with the repair technician who completed the repairs. The vehicle may need additional diagnostic and repair work before it is retested. Repairs must be made and the back of the VIR must be completed prior to returning for each retest.

Step 5: 

Repair Advice Program
Upon failing four tests, vehicles must be reviewed by Clean Air Car Check's Diagnostic Technician, who will review the repairs that have been made to the vehicle, discuss repair options, and help you develop a repair plan free of charge.  To schedule an appointment, call 1-888-240-1684 and select “4” in the menu.  (Please have your test and/or vehicle information available).
Vehicles that have failed four emissions tests are required to participate in the Repair Advice Program before any additional retests are permitted.

Please bring to your appointment:

Your vehicle, the Vehicle Inspection Report (test results), and any receipts or repair orders detailing the parts and work done to the vehicle related to failure of the emissions test.  Please make sure your hood latch is in working condition for an under hood inspection.

Please do not bring pets with you to your appointment.


Waiver Information


Under certain conditions, your vehicle may qualify for a one-time waiver.  The waiver is a temporary exemption from additional repairs for vehicles that continue to fail the test.  Therefore, the next time your vehicle is due for an emission check, it must pass in order to be registered.  Only one waiver, valid for one test cycle, will be issued for the lifetime of the vehicle.

The following criteria must be met to apply for a waiver:

  • The vehicle has failed two or more tests.
  • All emission control equipment applicable to your vehicle is present and visually operational.
  • Appropriate repairs were made in an attempt to correct the vehicle’s emission failure.
  • Repairs were performed between two failing tests.
  • The vehicle shows an emissions reduction from its initial test to its most current test.
  • For 1976-1980 model year vehicles, at least $75 has been spent on appropriate emissions-related repairs since the initial failure.
  • For 1981-1995 model year vehicles, at least $300 has been spent on emission-related repairs performed by an Indiana Certified Emissions Repair Facility. Please note: all original receipts detailing specific parts and repairs made to your vehicle must be presented to station management.
  • For model year 1996 and newer vehicles, at least $450 has been spent on emission-related repairs performed by an Indiana Certified Emissions Repair Facility, must have at least 150,000 miles on the odometer and the vehicle must be at least eight model years of age to be eligible for a minimum expenditure waiver.
  • To apply for a waiver, the vehicle owner must present the Vehicle Inspection Report and repair receipts to the manager at any Clean Air Car Check facility. An appointment will be scheduled with the program's Diagnostic Technician, who will verify the repairs and approve the waiver, if all the waiver criteria have been met.

If the vehicle’s exhaust system has been tampered with, the vehicle is not eligible for a waiver. Tampering is removing or making inoperable any system or device used to control emissions from a motor vehicle engine.  The motor vehicle is defined as any self-propelled vehicle designed for transporting persons or property on a street or highway. The only exception to the tampering rule is the need to install a new certified emission control system or device that is equally effective in reducing vehicle emissions.

Tampering may include, but is not limited to:

  • Removing the catalytic converter, air pump, and exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) valve, or doing anything to keep them from working properly, such as disconnecting vacuum lines and electrical or mechanical parts of the pollution control system.
  • Adjusting any element of a car or truck’s emission control design so that it no longer meets the manufacturer’s specifications.
  • Installing a replacement part that is not the same in design and function as the part that was originally on the vehicle.
  • Adding a part that was not originally certified on the vehicle, such as installing a turbocharger.